Shell sells LPG business in Hong Kong and Macau

first_imgImage: ShellThe Hague-based LNG giant Shell has entered into a deal to sell its liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) business in Hong Kong and Macau to DCC Energy.The conditional sale is worth about of $150.3 million.“This sale supports Shell’s strategic commitment to focus downstream activities on areas where we can be most competitive,” John Abbott, Shell Downstream Director, said in a statement.“This is one of the last of our wholly owned LPG businesses and this sale is another step in Shell’s ongoing portfolio optimisation strategy to deliver $30 billion of divestments between 2016 and 2018,” Abbott added.As part of the sale, Shell will be entering into a long-term brand license agreement with DCC Energy that will ensure the Shell brand remains visible across the LPG business in Hong Kong and Macau.All local Shell LPG employees affected will be given an option to transition to DCC Energy, according to the company.The sale is expected to conclude in the first quarter of the next year, subject to the receipt of regulatory approvals.last_img read more

Open all hours

first_img Eduardo Reyes is Gazette features editor Anyone who’s taken time out to read my recent Gazette features will know that I’ve received many pieces of legal services and legal market surveys and research down the years. Sometimes they impress, and sometimes they don’t – and unlike restaurant critics who haven’t worked as chefs, I’ve had to put my credibility on the line by doing surveys that are judged by others. One finding that caught my eye recently was from a survey conducted by Peppermint Technology, who worked with some of the names that commonly get mentioned in the same sentence as the phrases ‘brave new world’ and ‘legal services market’. 81% of ‘consumers’ (I know, I know, ‘client’ is my preferred word too), ‘are in favour of an out of hours service’ the Peppermint survey found. Is that a challenge to most practices? No part of the legal profession works notoriously short hours. I think most emails from my solicitor about arrive on Sunday, or in the evening, and I know he isn’t unusual. So why does a finding like Peppermint’s sound like it might require a change in solicitors’ working habits if they are to compete with newer, larger market entrants? Is this consumer/client preference a ‘challenge’ to a small practice? Presumably not, though that does not mean that no action is required. I suspect that this is mostly a challenge of communication. For many solicitors their commitment and availability is there – it just isn’t worn on their sleeve in the way that banks, say, broadcast 24-7 telephone services. But if a practice can devise a way to state its commitment, and somehow define post-5.30pm availability (ring-fenced and made predictable for reasons of sanity and a home life of course), this is surely an area where smaller practices shouldn’t fear new market entrants? last_img read more

Doyle ruled out as QPR ease Austin back

first_imgKevin Doyle will miss Saturday’s game against Yeovil, QPR boss Harry Redknapp has confirmed.The Republic of Ireland striker, who is on loan at Loftus Road from Wolves, picked up a knee injury at Birmingham and missed Rangers’ defeat against Brighton on Tuesday.He is also a doubt for next week’s trip to Sheffield Wednesday but it is hoped that he will be available for the game at Middlesbrough on 22 March.AdChoices广告With top scorer Charlie Austin sidelined, Doyle’s absence has been a further blow to Rangers’ dwindling hopes of automatic promotion.But they have been encouraged by the progress of Austin, who has been jogging this week as part of his rehabilitation following shoulder surgery.Redknapp said: “He [Doyle] is no good for tomorrow – he’s tweaked a knee ligament and we need to let that settle down and then see how he is.“Charlie did some running for the first time but there’s a lot of work to do to there and we’ve got to make sure we get him right in the next few weeks.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Cypha Da King Set to Release First Solo album: “The Kingdom”

first_imgRapper and Producer Cypha D King has finally released a date for his debut album. With much anticipation from his fans, artists and those who know his lyrical prowess, Cypha is cooking up an 8 to 10 track album, just for them.“It’ll be special. The album will be free for download online… working on the website now,” he shared.Cypha has been silently, but with much impact, producing songs for artists like Queen V, Takun J, DenG, Soul Fresh, F dot A, Sweetz and much more. Known as “Mister Yes Sir,” his punch lines dominates tracks he’s featured on or produced, promising “there is more where those came from.”Tracks from the upcoming album have been sampled, and is being played on radio stations. “Blow your mind,” which is a ladies favorite, shows a seductive side of Cypha’s music.IN HIS OWN WORDS – Interview with Cypha Da KingLIB LIFE caught up with Cypha Da King in the following interview:LIB LIFE: If producing is your “area,” as the cliché goes, tell me how you became a rapper.Cypha: I’ve always been a writer, do verses on one or two people’s stuff, doing features. And for awhile, people have been telling me to do an album. As a producer, when you do certain tracks, you have an idea of how you want it to sound at the end. It’s hard to get it out of certain artists, and sometimes I end up writing it myself the way I want it. I just feel Liberians are at a point now where we can measure up to guys like MIA and Ice Prince based on our talents. As for me, I’m more like a sacrificial lamb. The music business is not too much about music anymore so you have to be marketable and they have to like you. You have to know how to carry yourself as an artist, and a lot of artists aren’t there yet. They may be there musically, but everything else-wise, like the whole package, is not there. You can rap from now until 2020, that doesn’t mean you are marketable. You can have punch lines but can you writea love song? Can you write something they can dance to in the club? LIB LIFE: What can artists do to get to that stage?Cypha: Do your homework. Study the music. Since in Africa, I listen to all the African rappers and see what they use that’s good for them, and what they do that doesn’t work for them. You take bits and pieces from here and there and put it out there.Listen to the album and you’ll know why I am a sacrificial lamb. “The Kingdom,” wherever you are and wherever you are comfortable, and you are in that place where you know you rule and you are a king in that area, that’s your kingdom. Whether it’s in your house, your office, your car, the street, in the hood, wherever you know you rule and you lock it down, HNIC (head n**ga in charge), that’s your kingdom, that’s you.The album is very diverse. I didn’t want to do too many collaborations; being though that this is my very first official album. Dec 19, 2015 is the release date and it will be something different, not your typical album from a rapper, stuff that people won’t expect me to be doing. LIB LIFE: Tell us how it all started because you’ve put in a lot of work to come this far.Cypha: Let’s take it way back. My mother always had me playing in the school since 16 or 17. It started when my mother had me playing the keyboard when I was four. It has always been in my blood. I played African drums in the church; played saxophone in the school band; played drums in a band; played in a rock band; and interned in a studio. So it’s been a long time. LIB LIFE: Sounds like you are familiar with different genres of music?Cypha: Yes.LIB LIFE: A lot of people don’t know that you were born in America to Liberian parents. What inspired you to want to affiliate yourself with the Liberian music industry instead of American music?Cypha: My first trip to Liberia was in 2006. I spent five or six months seeing how everything was on the ground; definitely to see where the music game was. On that trip, I decided that I needed to come home and lend a helping hand as much as I can with studio, productions, writing, advice and consultation. In 2008, DJ Blue, Hazem and I opened Blue links Records on Camp Johnson Road.LIB LIFE: Your objective of coming out here to motivate, stimulate, enhance and develop the industry has worked out to the satisfaction of the people. And because of that your track record is amazing. During the heat of Ebola, your team used music and jingles to keep so many people from contracting the deadly virus – and have been recognized by international NGO’s for your efforts. Do you feel that you’ve done what you set out to do out here?Cypha: Yes we have! Blue Links and our team. Blue Links started in 2008 and the first song we did was “Where I’m from” featuring Queen V and Nasseman. Our first HD video had a big release, it was the first time any song had that much impact behind it. After that we worked with Takun J, Nasseman and various artists. I am a producer and can produce music, jazz, Hip Co, jazz and all types of music.When it comes to business, Hott FM and Blue Links, and soon to be Hot TV…I don’t really talking about my business too much…most businesses I invest in privately and wait for them to bubble to a certain point, then the public will know about them. I consider myself to be a businessman. LIB LIFE: Can you hold your own?Cypha: Without a job, I started my own hustle from throwing parties at the club, the Blue Links, radio shows at three to four different radio stations. It’s like the Liberian dream, move to Liberia and become successful. I’m not rich, but far from being broke. There’s a lot of stuff out there that overshadows good Liberian music. I need your support morally and financially. If you see a song on iTunes for $99, buy it. I might make the whole album free. I want to do something different. I want it to be where people won’t have a choice but to have the album… download it!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more