Mineral exploration near Haines given green light to expand

first_imgEconomy | Energy & Mining | Environment | Federal Government | Outdoors | SoutheastMineral exploration near Haines given green light to expandAugust 24, 2016 by Emily Files, KHNS-Haines Share:The mountain range Constantine is exploring as part of the Palmer Project. (Constantine Metal Resources)A Canadian company conducting exploration for a potential mine about 35 miles north of Haines was recently granted permission to grow its project.Last week, the Federal Bureau of Land Management approved Constantine Metal Resources’ plan to expand operations at its Palmer Project site. The plan includes building a couple miles of road, along with culverts and bridges, to provide easier access to more drilling sites.An environmental analysis found that while the work will have some impacts on water and wildlife, it says the endeavor shouldn’t cause significant harm.Right now, Constantine relies heavily on helicopters to to shuttle employees and equipment to exploration sites along the mountain. Workers drill holes into the rock that average between 500 and 2,500 feet deep, looking for copper, zinc, gold and silver.“There’s a lot of activity going on in that area of the mountain and it makes sense now to re-establish access to that area to better service those activities without the need for a helicopter for all operations,” said Liz Cornejo, Constantine’s exploration and community manager.Constantine had permission for up to five acres of ground disturbance. They now plan to build an access road that extends across Glacier Creek up a mountain close to the main mineral deposit. That activity mandates an environmental assessment by the BLM.The analysis looks at potential impacts to water quality, wildlife, fisheries, visual resources and more. It took about a year to complete and garnered more than 200 public comments. The assessment draws on studies from agencies like the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and research conducted by Constantine itself.“It is our responsibility and goal to make sure that operations we permit on public land are safe and protective of natural resources and the local community,” said BLM field manager Dennis Teitzel.A graphic showing the road extension plans. (Constantine Metal Resources)Teitzel says the plan met those standards. The environmental assessment acknowledges that the expansion will have some adverse impacts on Glacier Creek and wildlife. But the BLM determined that the potential effects are not significant.Guy Archibald with the Southeast Alaska Conservation Council sees it differently. SEACC was one of several groups whose comments to the BLM centered on environmental concerns. Other groups included Lynn Canal Conservation and the Chilkat Indian Village of Klukwan, about 15 miles south of the Palmer Project.One of the conservation group’s major worries is the road construction and other work around Glacier Creek could affect the rivers it flows into. The Klehini River and Chilkat River are important resources for subsistence and commercial salmon fishing.“This is what we hope not to see above the Klehini River,” Archibald said. “There’s too many people and communities and culture that rely on healthy water and fisheries up there. We’ve seen it happen before, we don’t want to see it happen again.”One of Archibald’s major concerns has to do with the possibility that the road construction could strike rock that contains sulfide, and cause acid rock drainage, harming water and wildlife.Constantine’s Cornejo says that’s a risk they’ve evaluated and found to be unlikely.“All of the rocks that we’re working for the area of the road building are non-acid-generating,” she said. “And we’ve done numerous tests and all of the data is showing that there is no likelihood of acid rock generation.”The BLM also put an additional requirement in place to try to minimize the potential for acid rock generation. Constantine must have a geologist on site inspecting road work on a daily basis during construction for ‘unanticipated exposures of sulfide minerals.’Archibald says that’s not enough.“Because once acid mine generation starts happening, it’s very hard to stop it,” he said.Along with the road construction monitoring, the BLM lists a few other requirements. They include monitoring for raptor nests and mountain goats and that the company provide a buffer to keep activity away from those areas.Constantine’s exploration right now consists of drilling holes from the surface of the mountain. In the future, it could involve underground exploration, which would require another round of studies and permitting.“So at this point it’s something we are evaluating but not yet proposing,” Cornejo said. “And so it’s important to look at our activities as they’re currently proposed, which is just the road work to help support existing exploration activities.”Cornejo says every rock, soil and water sample they take goes towards evaluating the potential for a mine. They hope the newly-approved road will help make that exploration easier and safer. The company plans to start building the road this fall and finish construction next summer.View BLM documents and Constantine’s plan of operations here.Share this story:last_img read more

Free pool parties for Armidale and Guyra

first_imgFree pool parties for Armidale and Guyra The region’s pools will be the place to cool off this weekend, with two free pool parties organised for Armidale and Guyra.The Kids’ Pool Party will be held at the Monckton Aquatic Centre on Saturday evening, followed by the Guyra Pool Party at the Guyra Swimming Pool on Sunday evening.There will be a range of local food vendors at each event, as well as plenty of fun activities for the whole family. Pool inflatables will be set up in the Armidale pool, while Guyra’s event will have inflatable games on the grass. The family-friendly film SCOOB! will be projected at sundown at both pool parties.Unfortunately COVID-19 restrictions have meant numbers will be limited, so Armidale Regional Council is encouraging everyone to get there on time to guarantee entry.These free events have been made possible by a $10,000 grant from the NSW Government.Each party will run from 6:00pm until 10:30pm. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Armidale, Armidale Regional Council, coronavirus, council, covid-19, Family, film, food, Government, Guyra, local council, NSWlast_img read more

Keeping Tasmania on destination to-do list for NSW and QLD tourists

first_imgKeeping Tasmania on destination to-do list for NSW and QLD tourists Michael Ferguson,Minister for State GrowthTourism Tasmania’s interstate brand campaign, Come Down for Air, encourages Australians to keep Tasmania top of mind when considering their next holiday.Today, the campaign is launching back into two of Tasmania’s biggest visitor markets – New South Wales and Queensland.The past nine months have been incredibly hard for Tasmanian tourism operators and businesses that rely on interstate visitors as we’ve taken the necessary steps to keep Tasmanians safe from COVID-19.During that time, we’ve seen a huge amount of support from Tasmanians who have taken the opportunity to explore our beautiful State as they holidayed at home.This month, the Tasmanian Government, through Tourism Tasmania, has started the next phase of a program of activity aimed at rebuilding visitation to the State to support industry recovery.The Come Down for Air campaign recommenced in the key markets of Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia in mid-January and the campaign launched into New Zealand for the first time in a decade on January 17.Today, we’re returning into the New South Wales and Queensland markets with a $2.35 million campaign, which will run until June 30, supporting businesses as they emerge from the disrupted summer season and into winter.We’re serious about supporting Tasmanian businesses, and the broader visitor economy and the advertisements are designed to deliver a moment of calm to potential travellers, providing a much-needed break to traditional forms of television and radio advertising.As a result, they’re a little different – but in a good way.They show the breadth and depth of what’s possible to experience across Tasmania, from Maria Island to King Island, wooden boat building in Franklin to Penny Farthing racing in Evandale.Most importantly, the ads are designed to remind mainland Australians that Tasmania can offer a welcome break from the stresses of modern life and it’s the perfect place to Come Down For Air.The campaign has been designed to enable flexibility to respond to changes in border restrictions should they occur and to ensure they are aligned to government messaging.You can visit the campaign website at https://www.discovertasmania.com.au/air /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AusPol, Australia, campaign, Evandale, Ferguson, Government, industry, New South Wales, New Zealand, NSW, QLD, Queensland, South Australia, TAS, Tasmania, Tassie, Victoria, Western Australialast_img read more

A healthy population is better equipped to handle a pandemic

first_imgA healthy population is better equipped to handle a pandemic The 103rd Dies Natalis is to take place on 9 March. Online, this time, due to the global outbreak of COVID-19. Wageningen University & Research is also affected by the pandemic and is working on preventing future outbreaks in different ways. Experts discuss this topic on 9 March during the celebration entitled Pandemic Prevention, Prediction and Preparedness. Professor of Consumption and Healthy Lifestyles Emely de Vet is one of them.‘That is not how I see it. Being overweight is not a personal choice but a societal problem. As long as 80 per cent of the products available in the supermarket do not fall within the food guide pyramid, and three-quarters of the products on sale are unhealthy, changing one’s lifestyle will be difficult for most people.’ With ten million people chronically ill, we can no longer think casually about lifestyle Does one’s vulnerability in a pandemic depend on lifestyle? ‘Yes. An unhealthy lifestyle increases the chance of chronic diseases, and that is what makes you vulnerable. People who are overweight, for example, suffer from diabetes and cardiovascular diseases more frequently. These are all risk-factors in an exacerbated response to a corona infection. This is something minister De Jonge repeatedly stressed last year: live healthily. If you are fit, your immune system works better, which makes you less vulnerable in a pandemic.’Still, there are many who think: It won’t be that bad.‘True. However, this is a far too casual attitude if you consider that there are ten million chronically ill people in the Netherlands. This includes diseases with mild symptoms such as hayfever and bronchitis, but over half -in excess of 5.4 million- have more than one chronic affliction and visited their general practitioner with symptoms (such as pain, mental afflictions, restricted daily functioning, ed.) in 2019.So, the corona pandemic is a wakeup call?‘Absolutely. It demonstrates how urgently we need to address the lifestyle issue. Not just from the perspective of sickness but also because it overburdens the healthcare system. Even without corona, lifestyle-related afflictions place a huge burden on the health care system, which is currently under extreme pressure because people with preconditions such as obesity or diabetes end up in the ICU. The fact that these vulnerable groups are the first to get vaccinated is just, but it does prompt reactions. As is if they themselves are to blame for having to be admitted to the ICU and occupying a bed there.’ More fruit and ten minutes of exercise makes us more resilient against a pandemic A doctor who mentioned last year that a disproportionate number of people from non-western backgrounds occupy the ICUs was called out for it. Do you feel that we should state what people are in the ICUs? ‘Yes, but within the correct context. The causes are much more complicated than mere background, non-compliance with the corona measures or a lack of motivation to live a healthy lifestyle. The crux is that these people are more vulnerable due to their adverse position in society. Corona reveals the painful reality of socioeconomic inequalities and amplifies the differences. Many people with low-wage jobs are not able to work from home. Their smaller houses, which they often occupy with more people, are located in high-density neighbourhoods. Moreover, they experience more stress than usual about their income and fear of losing their job due to corona. Healthy eating is not a priority, and even less so if healthy products are more expensive than unhealthy alternatives. These people are relatively more often afflicted by health issues such as obesity and diabetes, which increase the risks of a corona infection. Thus, there are groups for whom it is much more difficult to escape the consequences of corona and a pandemic.’How will you ensure we are fitter before the next pandemic emerges?‘Our Consumption and Healthy Lifestyles group is in a unique position because we merge a large number of different disciplines. From health sciences to psychology, pedagogy, geography and anthropology. Understanding human behaviour and designing interventions call for a broad perspective.’What interventions might that be?‘Various ones: from food education in primary schools to adjustments in the food-environment (supermarkets, gas stations, catering, educational facilities, ed.) making it easier to make healthier choices. Moreover, there are digital tools in healthcare that help patients achieve behavioural changes. We collaborate with partners in governance and practice to study the effects of policy and interventions. A striking example is provided by the academic workplace public health (AGORA) in which we collaborate with the GGD (public health service) of North and East Gelderland and 22 municipalities to put scientific research to the test and create societal impact.’Interventions are often aimed at small changes in behaviour, such as choosing an apple rather than a snack. Is that sufficient to protect us from the next virus outbreak? ‘For you, as an individual, it may not make much of a difference, but if the entire population eats two items of fruit, it does. If all of us exercise ten minutes a day, the population as a whole becomes more resilient against a future pandemic. Thus, we must not approach lifestyle as an individual responsibility but address the system that perpetuates an unhealthy lifestyle, for example, by introducing fat or sugar taxes. Many in The Hague have petitioned for such measures over the years, and corona is now increasing the urgency. I, for one, am happy that the importance of lifestyle and living environment is more often included in election programmes than four years ago, and that the government has recently earmarked two hundred million euros to improve the wellbeing and lifestyle of vulnerable groups.’ /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:anthropology, bronchitis, cardiovascular, chronic disease, education, environment, Government, healthcare, infection, Netherlands, prevention, Professor, psychology, public health, supermarket, university, University of Wageningenlast_img read more

Climate resilience a priority for Magnetic Island

first_imgClimate resilience a priority for Magnetic Island Magnetic Island is the jewel in Townsville’s crown and Townsville City Council and the local community are working to keep it that way.Council and the Magnetic Island community have identified a list of 18 projects aimed at building resilience, reducing emissions, and creating jobs on the island.One of these projects will now be chosen to receive funding from the Local Government Association of Queensland through the State Government’s Great Barrier Reef Islands Decarbonisation project.Council Community Health, Safety and Environmental Sustainability Committee chairperson Maurie Soars said its important that Council plays a role in building the community’s resilience to climate change.“We live in a beautiful part of Australia that is in close proximity to a natural wonder of the world – the Great Barrier Reef – and it’s important we continue to take action against climate change,” Cr Soars said.“Council staff have partnered with the State Government to work with several organisations and community members over the past 18 months to develop a list of projects that would help build resilience and reduce emissions on Magnetic Island and create local jobs.“Now that we’ve been invited to apply for $125,000 funding through this program, we can start the process of engaging with the community to choose which projects take priority and how we can roll them out.“There is also the ability for Townsville to apply for joint funding with other participating councils to form a Climate Resistance Alliance.”The list of projects up for consideration are:Electric bicycle rental serviceLow-emission on-Island shuttle busEstablishing a native plant nurseryPath networks to support active transportSustainability and environmental education programEnergy efficient retrofitsGreen hydrogen transport demonstrationAquaculture production feasibility studyWaste facility installation of solar PVTourism Master PlanEnergy demand management incentive schemeSolar hot water systemsOrganic waste recycling feasibility studySolar PV rooftop systemsGlass recycling feasibility studyLow-emission marine transportMicrogrid feasibility studyWater smart demonstration community.Council will continue to collaborate with stakeholders and the community to deliver the chosen projects. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, climate change, community health, demonstration, Government, Great Barrier Reef, health, Local Government, production, QLD, Queensland, recycling, resilience, sustainability, Townsville, Townsville City Council, Transportlast_img read more

Motor Mouth: Cadillac shows how car sharing should be done

first_img advertisement Motor Mouth: The upsides of car-sharing are questionable On the face of it, Cadillac’s new car-sharing program would do none of the above. Indeed, BOOK by Cadillac would initially seem like little more than a born-again luxury marque pandering to the whims of fickle one-percenters in a desperate attempt to regain the credibility it so assiduously wasted for more decades.Essentially, what General Motors is testing in New York City is a program that will let the rich and fickle drive any Cadillac they want, anytime they want. In exchange for $1,500 a month (no downpayment required, says Eneuri Acosta, Cadillac’s lifestyle, influencer and partnership communications manager), users can swap amongst any of Cadillac’s 10 models. The boss is in town and wants to go to the theatre? Grab a CT6 and chauffeur him/her around in style. Want to haul your 26-foot Sundancer in the luxury you deserve? Pop down to the dealer and swap into an Escalade. And, if humiliating BMW M5 owners at a track day is your thing, well then, Cadillac has a CTS-V with your name on it. That $1,500 even includes all regular scheduled maintenance. Hell, Cadillac even pays for the insurance (mainly, one suspects that getting a broker to put a price on 18 different cars in a year would be nigh on impossible). The only limitation the “subscription” imposes is that you’re only allowed to swap cars 18 times in a year.RELATED We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca RELATED TAGSMotor MouthMotor MouthNew VehiclesAirbnb Inc.Alfred SloanAutomotive TechnologyBMW M5Cadillac CTSCadillac EscaladeCanadaChevrolet CamaroChevrolet CorvetteChevrolet SilveradoDavid BoothElectric VehiclesEneuri AcostaFord F-150Ford Motor CompanyGeneral Motors CorporationHertz Global Holdings Inc.Honda PilotLubbockNew York CityNorth AmericaScience and TechnologyTechnologyThe Michelin GroupUnited StatesZipcar Inc. See More Videos Elon Musk sees trucks, ride-sharing in Tesla’s futureI know what you’re thinking: The “sharing economy” is supposed to be about helping a burdened middle class better weather a decade of stagnant wages, not pandering to Bay Street bandits looking for new ways to be spoiled. But before dismissing Cadillac’s experiment as yet another sop to the uber rich, think about this: What if the very same one-price-buys-all program were spread to more proletarian vehicles. What if, instead of Cadillac, Chevrolet became a proponent of car-by-subscription leases?One of the truisms that environmentalists — especially electric vehicle activists — fail to acknowledge is that consumers don’t buy cars for what they do every day, but for what they may do but once a month or even once a year. Thus a Corvette owner may only get to one track event a year, but owns a 1LZ Z06 with super-sticky Michelin Pilot Super Sport Cup 2 gumballs anyway. If Ford had to rely solely on workaday commercial users for its truck sales, the F-150 would not be the most popular vehicle in North America: Contractors may use their pickup beds daily, but the average truck owner rarely needs its 10,000+ pound trailer towing capacity or its ability to haul a ton of crushed stone. Yet, as the soaring sales of trucks and SUVs indicate, wants are so much more powerful than needs, precious few consumers willing to, as activists so often recommend when they’re pumping EV ownership, amble down to their local Hertz Rent-A-Car on those occasions when specialized needs arise.A car-on-command program, however, just might solve the problem. Imagine a single lease — BOOK by Cadillac doesn’t even charge a fee for swapping — that allowed you to drive a Silverado when hauling your daughter off to her first year of college but scoot around town in a traffic- and parking spot-friendly Cruze when not hauling a load or towing a trailer. Taking the hockey team to an away game? Well, an extended-wheelbase Express has seating for three complete lines. And I can have a Camaro Z/28 for track days? Sign me up!Indeed, rethinking car sharing as envisaged by Cadillac might be the paradigm shift that the automotive world is searching so desperately for. No more buying more car than you need as contingency against “what if.” The multi-car household might become a thing of the past. And Lord knows you’re not getting Bubba from Lubbock out of his F-150 if he thinks he has to drive an electric vehicle full time. But, if he knows he can climb back into his shotgun-racked duallie any time he wants, maybe, just maybe, he won’t need to always drive that hulking gas guzzler all the time, gobbling up a gallon of precious high-test every 12 miles. The future is about mobility. Pride in car ownership is dead, the young have no affinity for anything four-wheeled and lending our cars out to strangers nilly-willy will soon be the automotive equivalent of Airbnb. So say the pundits.As Motor Mouth detailed last October 21, the numbers don’t bear out these cries of revolution. Despite more than a decade of growth, there are only (as of 2014) 5,048 shared cars in Canada and but a further 19,115 in the United States. Even more importantly, these “shared” cars have been woefully ineffective at their primary goal, namely getting consumers to eschew private ownership of automobiles so that we might reduce traffic and, more importantly, minimize emissions. One study noted that only 6,449 cars were actually taken off Canadian roads as a result of car sharing. The rest of the cars — 21,707 — that Impacts of Car2Go on Vehicle Ownership, Modal Shift, Vehicle Miles Travelled, and Greenhouse Gas Emissions study claimed were removed were the estimates of new car purchases suppressed. In other words, more than 75 per cent of the cars supposedly taken off the road — again, the primary goal of car sharing — were of the “we’d like to think” variety that conflates wishful thinking with hard reality.But what if there were a car-sharing program with a real potential to reduce fuel consumption? To lessen the environmental impact of tailpipe emissions? And, perhaps best of all, enhance the driving experience while achieving both laudable goals? center_img Trending in Canada Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Trending Videos Decry Cadillac’s BOOK program as a desperate attempt at luxury segment credibility all you like, but from my point of view, car-swapping leases look like that century-old promise from General Motors’ then CEO Alfred Sloan of “A car for every purse and purpose” brought to life thanks to the miracle of digital logistics. And imagine this: If just 20 per cent of next year’s Silverado purchasers took occasional ownership of a Bolt EV, that would be more than 100,000 gas-guzzling pickups off our roads (at least for part of the time) and the electric car promise fulfilled. That makes Zipcar and car2go look pitiful indeed. ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

Cassini 'CAT Scan' Maps Particle Clumps In Saturn's Rings; Mass May Be 2-3 Times Estimates

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: May 21, 2007 Saturn’s largest and most dense ring is composed of tightly packed clumps of particles separated by nearly empty gaps, according to new findings from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The clumps in Saturn’s B ring are neatly organized and constantly colliding, which surprised scientists. “The rings are different from the picture we had in our minds,” said University of Colorado at Boulder Professor Larry Esposito, principal investigator for the Cassini ultraviolet imaging spectrograph. “We originally thought we would see a uniform cloud of particles. Instead we find that the particles are clumped together with empty spaces in between,” he said. “If you were flying under Saturn’s rings in an airplane, you would see these flashes of sunlight come through the gaps, followed by dark and so forth,” said Esposito, a professor at CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. “This is different from flying under a uniform cloud of particles.” Because previous interpretations assumed the ring particles were distributed uniformly, scientists underestimated the total mass of Saturn’s rings. The mass may actually be two or more times previous estimates, said the scientists. “These results will help us understand the overall question of the age and hence the origin of Saturn’s rings,” said Josh Colwell, assistant professor of physics at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, and a team member of the Cassini ultraviolet imaging spectrograph. A paper outlining the results appears in the journal Icarus. Scientists observed the brightness of a star as the rings passed in front of the star on multiple occasions. The technique provided a measurement of the amount of ring material between the spacecraft and the star, according to the team. “Combining many of these occultations at different viewing geometries is like doing a CAT scan of the rings,” said Colwell, a former research associate at CU-Boulder’s LASP. “By studying the brightness of stars as the rings pass in front of them, we are able to map the ring structure in 3-D and learn more about the shape, spacing and orientation of clusters of particles.” The observations confirm that the gravitational attraction of ring particles to each other creates clumps, or “self-gravity wakes,” he said. If the clumps were farther from Saturn, they might continue to grow into a moon. But because they are so close to Saturn, their different speeds around the planet counteract the gravitational attraction so that the clumps get stretched like taffy and pulled apart. The clumps are constantly forming and coming apart once they reach about 30 meters to 50 meters, or about 100 feet to 160 feet across, according to the researchers. “At any given time, most particles are going to be in one of the clumps, but the particles keep moving from clump to clump as clumps are destroyed and new ones are formed,” said Colwell. In the dense B ring, the classic cloud model of the rings predicted that particles collide about twice per hour on average, he said. “Our results show that the particles in the B ring spend most of their time in almost continuous contact with other particles,” said Colwell. The clumps may act like super-sized particles, changing the way the rings spread due to collisions. The clumps are seen in all regions of the B ring that are not opaque, said the researchers. One surprising aspect of the measurements is that the clumps in the B ring are broad and very flat, like big sheets of particles. The clumps are roughly 10 times to 50 times wider than they are thick, according to the study. Scientists also are surprised that the B ring clumps are flatter and have smaller spaces between them than those found in the neighboring A ring. A picture of the rings based on these results is available on the Web at: www.nasa.gov/cassini, saturn.jpl.nasa.gov and at lasp.colorado.edu/cassini/whats_new/ . The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini-Huygens mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The ultraviolet imaging spectrograph was built, and the team is based, at CU-Boulder.last_img read more

Manuel Laguna Appointed Interim Dean of CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 16, 2009 Senior Associate Dean Manuel Laguna of the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado at Boulder has been appointed interim dean effective Nov. 1.Interim Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Stein Sture announced the appointment of Laguna today.”Manuel Laguna has the background and experience to guide the Leeds School in the coming months,” Sture said. “I have full confidence in his capabilities to assume the responsibilities of dean.”Laguna will assume the position of Dennis Ahlburg, who has accepted the presidency of Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas.”I am pleased to be taking over from Dennis Ahlburg who has done so much to position the Leeds School for success going forward,” said Laguna.The Media One Professor of Management Science, Laguna joined the faculty of the Leeds School in 1991, after one year as a U S West Postdoctoral Fellow. He earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in operations research and industrial engineering at the University of Texas in Austin.Prior to serving as associate dean, Laguna held the chair of the Systems Division at the Leeds School. Laguna will serve as interim dean while the university launches a search to fill the permanent position.last_img read more

Ericsson CEO maintains focus on European 5G lag

first_img Tags Home Ericsson CEO maintains focus on European 5G lag Mobile World Live is the online service dedicated to providing the mobile industry with daily news coverage & analysis of the biggest global market developments. Read more Previous ArticleTelus to raise $1B as Canada 5G battle hots upNext ArticleAIS looks to LG Uplus for immersive 5G content Former Ericsson employees charged in bribery case Related Author 5GBorje EkholmEricssoncenter_img Ericsson CEO Borje Ekholm (pictured) used a shareholder meeting to hammer home previous warnings about the need to speed 5G deployments in Europe or risk lagging the US and China.Ekholm explained Europe was coming from behind on 5G because of a legacy lag from 4G, and explained political action is needed to speed deployments of the next-generation tech.Europe has “very few digital champions” compared with the US and China, he explained adding 5G was an opportunity not to repeat the mistakes of the past.The CEO delved further into warnings of a threat to jobs, explaining services “will be created where the networks are first”.Ekholm’s focus on 5G has been a key theme so far in 2021, with the executive already warning of a lack of incentive for operators to deploy the technology and a knock-on effect for the region’s industry and economy.The CEO noted Ericsson would continue to seek the “great growth opportunities in the enterprise segment”, and explained an acquisition of US edge equipment company Cradlepoint in 2020 was a “win-win for our customers since its solutions create new revenue streams for mobile network operators”. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore1 29 MAR 2021 Telkomsel turns on 5G in major cities Asia Mobile World Live Mobile Mix: Buzzing for Barcelonalast_img read more

Phil eyes another record at site of first Tour win

first_imgPhil Mickelson made history 30 years ago in Tucson, becoming one of seven amateurs to win a PGA Tour event since 1940. Lefty is back in Arizona this weekend and he has a chance to stand alone in the record book. A winner in his first two PGA Tour Champions starts, Mickelson could become the first player to win his first three starts on a PGA Tour-sanctioned tour this weekend in the Cologuard Classic at Tucson National. “I think it’s going to be a tough challenge for me here because the course allows you to play it a lot of different ways,” Mickelson said Thursday. “Although I’m going to play it pretty aggressively, I’m going to bring in a lot of trouble, too. If I can kind of eliminate some of the big misses, I think I’m going to make a lot of birdies.” Mickelson had no trouble at Tucson National and TPC Starr Pass in 1991, overcoming a triple bogey in the final round to win the Northern Telecom Open as a 20-year-old amateur. The former Arizona State player is still the last amateur to win a PGA Tour event. Mickelson returns to the desert with a chance to make it 3 for 3 on the senior tour. He won at Ozarks National in Missouri last August in his first start after turning 50 and followed that up with a win at the Country Club of Virginia in October. Full-field tee times from the Cologuard Classic Should he win in Tucson, the quest to make more history might have to wait a while. The five-time major champion still believes he can compete on the PGA Tour and his upcoming schedule includes The Players Championship, Honda Classic, Masters and possibly the Valero Texas Open. Mickelson, who has 44 career PGA Tour wins, has made four cuts in eight events this 2021 season. “I haven’t really looked at Champions Tour schedule,” he said. “I want to start playing on the regular tour with a little bit less stress. I’ve been really hard on myself when I make some mistakes and I’ve got to kind of ease up and play a little bit more free and a little bit lighter. If I can do that, I think I can shoot some pretty good scores out there.” Mickelson will have to put up some low numbers on Tucson National’s Catalina Course with a deep field set to tee it up starting Friday. Schwab Cup money leader Bernhard Langer is still going strong at 63 and is the defending champion after coming from four strokes back to win last year. Four-time major champion Ernie Els is second in the points standings. Major champions Davis Love III and Mike Weir also are in the field, as is former University of Arizona player Jim Furyk, who won his first two senior starts last year. “The guys are still competitive and they are still hungry, and that’s what we all enjoy,” Furyk said. “We enjoy the competition and maybe I don’t have to hit 320 yards anymore to do so. I’m enjoying it.” They’re all vying to win the unique Conquistador helmet awarded to the winner in Tucson. Mickelson first put the trophy on his head after winning as an amateur — he cut himself in the process — and did it twice more after consecutive wins in 1995-96. “It looks cool. I’ve got three of them that are wanting a fourth, they want a nice even number,” he said. “They want a foursome. They don’t like to go out as three, they’re always looking for a fourth, so that would be a nice fit.” So would doing something no other golfer has done.last_img read more